Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Word of the Day

eldritch\EL-dritch\adj. 1: weird, eerie

Example Sentence: Christina accompanied her ghost story by playing a recording filled with creaks, howls, and other eldritch sound effects.

Did you know? "Curse," "cobweb," "witch," "ghost," and even "Halloween" - all of these potentially spooky words have roots in Old English. "Eldritch," also, comes from a time when otherworldly beings were commonly thought to inhabit the earth. The word is about 500 years old and believed to have come from Middle English "elfriche," meaning "fairyland." The two components of "elfriche" - "elf" and "riche" - come from the Old English "aelf" and "rice" (words which meant, literally, "elf kingdom"). Robert Louis Stevenson wasn't scared of "eldritch." He used the term in his novel Kidnapped: "'The curse on him and his house, byre and stable, man, guest, and master, wife, miss, or bairn - black, black be their fall!' - The woman, whose voice had risen to a kind of eldritch sing-song, turned with a skip, and was gone."

My use: I am getting excited for all the eldritch that is known as Halloween.

1 comment:

Jenny said...

I love that word!